Why Space Matters: GEO Satellite operations, Part 7–Curves and Angles

Geosynchronous (GEO) satellites are wonderful.  They can see a lot of the Earth from 22,236 miles in space.  It’s why they make great observation and communications satellites.  Previous chapters explained some of the problems facing GEO satellites, too, such as solar influence and eclipses.  But now’s the time for a few lesser known problems GEO satellites […]

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Why Space Matters: GEO Satellite operations, Part 5.5–Indian GEO Flight Plan

Just a short blurb for you about a really great blog post from Planetary.org.  It’s definitely related to The Mad Spaceball’s GEO lesson series on this site.  I think it’s better written.  I wanted to provide, at the very least, the link for this post, titled “How to get a satellite to geostationary orbit”. As you […]

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Why Space Matters: GEO Satellite operations, Part 5–Lights & Music

During the last few lessons, the great advantages of satellites in a geostationary orbit (GEO) were espoused about ad nauseum.  The characteristics of persistence in communications and observations are the direct benefits of using a satellite in GEO.  Include the huge field of regard and simplified ground system requirements, and it’s really a no-brainer to […]

Read More Why Space Matters: GEO Satellite operations, Part 5–Lights & Music